How To Explore Trading Patterns And Relationships

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In this last article, we show you in more detail how to explore and find your own insights using the International Trade Graph Explorer tool.

Complex trade network

Background

All companies in this view have traded at least 3 goods in common, limited at 1000 nodes with Baker Hughes (BH).

You might use this graph for this focus company or others to:

  • Investigate UK Oil & Gas supply and delivery relationships and trading patterns into and out of the UK
  • Assess opportunities for supplying established operators by discovering types of goods imported/exported
  • Discover lesser known suppliers of goods for energy contracts worldwide
Highly competitive oil services businesses trading in similar goods
Recognised majors, obvious competitors 

 

  • Approx 25 major international business who import similar goods as BH which shows consistency in the oil services supply chain
  • Goods could be for assembly, manufacture or supply on major oil construction/maintenance contracts around the world. Businesses are probably in direct competition with BH. Goods could also be supplied by the same foreign suppliers.
Procurement specialists 
  • In this view, only 4 business export similar goods to BH. 3 of them are not direct competitors in the sense of EPC – Engineering, Procurement, Construction – contractors. They share only the Procurement component, probably engaged by other oil services businesses in support of maintenance contracts
  • Beyond the red arc shown, these goods are not exported by BH, although BH is importing these goods.
Clusters of goods show Baker has some unique trading patterns 

1&2  Shows exported (1) and imported (2) goods that are unique to BH in this view. This could be a unique contract or that BH has a niche business that others don’t have

3&4  These goods are also uniquely exported with at least three other businesses as shown by the connections.

To reproduce this view and explore the goods select Baker Hughes from the drop down. Click Align and position company nodes as required. Try drilling down on companies or setting Goods in common to 2.

DISCLAIMER: Whilst we have made every effort to ensure that this data is accurate, this is a free tool in beta and we make no warranties or guarantees on the use of the information. Interpretations are entirely our own based on observed trade movements. Includes data from uktradeinfo.com. For further information about our products and services please contact us.

Brands In The Automotive Industry Trade Networks

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In this second article, we use our International Trade Graph to look at Lotus, one of the well-known UK car brands, under ownership of Zhejiang Geely and Etika Automotive since 2017.

Trade network showing brands

We narrow the display down to companies with similar supply chains patterns – those that import or export at least three goods in common with Lotus.

Trade patterns

It reveals some companies that the non-industry observers would not have heard of, and when you consider the number of automotive companies with facilities in the UK, there are surprisingly few on this graph. This suggests that Lotus has some relatively rare goods in its supply chain. Can you guess what they are? And we are not referring to T-shirts and similar garments, which in this group only Lotus and McLaren export – a sign of their brand merchandising strategies!

And more

This free graph tool shows just the start of what can be done. We can:

  • Provide you with insights using other details that are not presented in the graph, such as frequency of trades, industry groupings, common routes of shipment and customs values; and
  • Combine with complementary data from third parties – and indeed from your organisation – to develop richer risk metrics customised for your workflows.

Contact us to find out more.

To explore the goods shown, pick this view from the drop down list of examples and hover your mouse over the goods to see their detailed descriptions. Position company nodes as required. Try drilling down on one of the other companies in the network.

DISCLAIMER: Whilst we have made every effort to ensure that this data is accurate, this is a free tool in beta and we make no warranties or guarantees on the use of the information. Interpretations are entirely our own based on observed trade movements. Includes data from uktradeinfo.com. For further information about our products and services please contact us.

Supplier Track Record at a Glance

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Trade network of Firefly Solar Generators

To explore trade networks for yourself, go to https://www.exabler.com/en/gexplorer and pick this view from the drop down list of examples. Click on goods nodes to see their UK trade statistics.  Try clicking on company nodes to drill down.

Trade finance transaction and counterparty due diligence

It is necessary but not sufficient to perform financial due diligence on the buyer or seller in a typical trade finance transaction. For example if parties in the transaction lack relevant experience, it presents a higher risk profile. Especially in innovative industries like the solar power sector, companies with a strong track record of cross-border sales and dealing with customs clearance are valuable.

Risk metrics from trade patterns

Our new International Trade Graph and the data behind it can be a valuable source of such information. For example, a client of your bank might be looking to buy equipment under product classification CN 850239801 from Firefly Solar. This graph shows that this was the only company in this nexus to file exports of those goods from the UK over the last year or two, suggesting that they don’t have too many competitors in the UK and your client might have good reason to wish to deal with them.

And more

This free graph tool shows just the start of what can be done. We can:

  • Provide you with insights using other details that are not presented in the graph, such as frequency of trades, industry groupings, common routes of shipment and customs values; and
  • Combine with complementary data from third parties – and indeed from your organisation – to develop richer risk metrics customised for your workflows.

Contact us to find out more.

DISCLAIMER: Whilst we have made every effort to ensure that this data is accurate, this is a free tool in beta and we make no warranties or guarantees on the use of the information. Interpretations are entirely our own based on observed trade movements. Includes data from uktradeinfo.com. For further information about our products and services please contact us.
  1.  EU Combined Nomenclature 2017: Generating sets, non-wind-powered and non-powered by spark-ignition internal combustion piston engine (excl. turbogenerators)

Blockchain 2.0: evolving tech-led business models

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Our previous blog post took a broad overview of business models, blockchain and trust. Today we take a look at business models and talk about LakeBanker. While they focus more on consumer financial services, many consumers are actually micro businesses, or “consumer+”. We see some interesting parallels to our work and we are delighted to be advising them.

Old and new phones

Continue reading “Blockchain 2.0: evolving tech-led business models”

Blockchain is not the panacea in business and banking

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Trust is hard to develop and can be lost in the blink of an eye. Without it, many business and finance relationships become prohibitively costly. Now blockchain and other new distributed ledger technologies (DLT) are proposing to reduce or even eliminate the need for trust. We argue in this short article series that to be valuable to customers, such projects cannot ignore the tremendous efficiency gained from trust in many situations.

In follow-up articles, we discuss the findings of the Imperial College London MSc consulting team 1. Their study revealed a very much nascent sector with projects of wildly differing levels of maturity. In another article, we look at LakeBanker, a project we are delighted to be advising. Their team is engaged in an ambitious approach to make better use of trust and data in finance with their flavour of Crowd Banking.

Containers Blocks in a Chain

Continue reading “Blockchain is not the panacea in business and banking”

  1. See our blog post from July

Technology in international trade regulations

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Our co-founder Ramin participating in the RegTech event.

Are Skilled Professionals Really Safe from Robots? This was the topic of discussion at a panel session hosted at the Digital Catapult Centre in London last week, organised by Balliol Knowledge Networks 1. We look at some of the implications of regulatory technologies for the future of international trade.

Continue reading “Technology in international trade regulations”

Press Release: Blockchain, global trade and supply chain finance – who will own the marketplaces?

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Blockchain, global trade and supply chain finance – who will own the marketplaces?  Banks, large multinationals, governments or others?

Network

Parkway Logic is pleased to announce that we are working closely with Imperial College Business School students to analyse what is really happening in this space. Continue reading “Press Release: Blockchain, global trade and supply chain finance – who will own the marketplaces?”

Simplify the export journey to support our small businesses

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conveyors export small business

EXPORTING will narrow our dangerously high trade gapthat’s the mantra. The UK Secretary of State for International Trade has admitted that the government’s goal to double exports to £1T by 2020 is going to be missed.

One reason for this is that smaller businesses do not have the tools, processes and resource necessary to trade compliantly and ultimately profitably – some only see risks in exploring outside their home market. Every international order in a new or existing market with a customer requires compliance to customs requirements, export controls, anti-fraud measures, 3rd party screening, etc.

Continue reading “Simplify the export journey to support our small businesses”

A milestone for smaller businesses at the WTO

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Entering into force today, the WTO’s Trade Facilitation Agreement is one to watch.

The ICC says ” – the first multilateral trade agreement to enter into force in over two decades – aims to make trade easier and simpler by cutting red-tape at borders.”

“Governments must work without delay to implement the provisions of the TFA working hand-in-hand with local businesses to identify key bottlenecks to trade across national borders.”, John Danilovich, ICC Secretary General

See the full article here: http://bit.ly/2lv8RKq